The former Australian team vice-captain took to social media following his press conference to explain why he needed to follow Cricket Australia protocols.

Australia's batsman David Warner leaves the field after being dismissed by South Africa's bowler Kagiso Rabada, for 28 runs on day three of the first cricket test match between South Africa and Australia at Kingsmead stadium in Durban, South Africa, Saturday, March 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)Warner dodges key questions about cheating scandal
Vows to do all he can to regain trust
Admits his days of playing for Australia could well be over
Says his priority now is to protect his family
Took responsibility “for my part” in the incident
Said what happened was inexcusable and he will pay for it for the rest of his life
David Warner has defended his emotional apology over his part in cricket’s ball- tampering scandal after he refused to answer questions about the role he, or others, played in the affair.

The former Australian team vice-captain took to social media following his press conference to explain why he needed to follow Cricket Australia protocols.

“I know there are unanswered questions and lots of them. I completely understand. In time i will do my best to answer them all. But there is a formal CA process to follow,” Warner tweeted nearly two hours after a press conference that was widely criticised by cricket fans on Twitter.

EEarlier he revealed he fears his international career could be over because of his role in cricket’s ball-tampering scandal.

“In the back of my mind I suppose there is a tiny ray of hope that I may one day be given the privilege of playing for my country again, but I am resigned to the fact that that may never happen,” he told a press conference.

Warner and axed captain Steve Smith received one-year suspensions for their role in the affair while batsman Cameron Bancroft has been banned for nine months.

Addressing the media for the first since Bancroft was caught tampering with the ball during the third Test against South Africa in Cape Town last week, Warner said he took responsibility for his actions.

But he refused to say if he was the chief architect or if other teammates were involved in the decision to use sandpaper on the ball, frustrating reporters and a nation demanding answers.

“I am here to talk about the part I played in this. It’s inexcusable. I am sorry,” Warner said…

via David Warner says he will regret his involvement in the tampering scandal for as long as he lives